Project Blue Beam – What is the Truth?

Serge Monast (1945 – December 5, 1996) was a Québécois investigative journalist, poet, essayist and conspiracy theorist. He is known to English-speaking readers mainly for Project Blue Beam (NASA) and associated conspiracy tropes.[1] His works on Masonic conspiracy theories and the New World Order also remain popular with French speaking conspiracy theorists and enthusiasts.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Monast was a journalist, poet and essayist. He was an active member of the Social Credit Party of Canada.
In the early 1990s, he started writing on the theme of the New World Order and conspiracies hatched by secret societies, being particularly inspired by the works of William Guy Carr.
He founded the International Free Press Agency (AIPL, l’ Agence Internationale de Presse libre), where he published most of his work on these themes, achieving some prominence with an interview on esotericist and ufologist Richard Glenn’s TV show Ésotérisme Expérimental, in which he repeatedly warned his audience about the dangers of a World Government.[2]
In 1994, he published Project Blue Beam (NASA), in which he detailed his claim that NASA, with the help of the United Nations, was attempting to implement a New Age religion with the Antichrist at its head and start a New World Order, via a technologically simulated Second Coming of Christ. He also gave talks on this topic.[3] Other conspiracy theorists have noted[4] the similarity of Project Blue Beam to the plots of Gene Roddenberry‘s unreleased 1975 Star Trek movie treatment The God Thing and the 1991 Star Trek: The Next Generation episode Devil’s Due.
In 1995, he published his most detailed work, Les Protocoles de Toronto (6.6.6), modeled upon The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, wherein he said a Masonic group called “6.6.6” had, for twenty years, been gathering the world’s powerful to establish the New World Order and control the minds of individuals.
By 1995 and 1996, Monast said he was being hunted by the police and authorities for involvement in “networks of prohibited information.” He had homeschooled his two children, who were then taken away and made wards of the state in September 1996 so that they would receive a public education. He died of a heart attack in his home in December 1996, at age 51, the day after being arrested and spending a night in jail.[5] His followers claim his death was suspicious, suggesting he was assassinated by “psychotronic weapons”[2] to keep from continuing his investigations,[6] and that the Mel Gibson character in the 1997 film Conspiracy Theory was modeled on him.[2]
Copies of his works still circulate on the Internet, and have influenced such later conspiracy theorists as American evangelical preacher Texe Marrs.[1] Some of his later works have been reissued by French publisher and conspiracy theorist Jacques Delacroix, along with others writing on the themes of Monast’s conspiracy-related work.[7]

Author: Gilbert Tan TS

IT expert with more than 20 years experience in Multiple OS, Security, Data & Internet , Interests include AI and Big Data, Internet and multimedia. An experienced Real Estate agent, Insurance agent, and a Futures trader. I am capable of finding any answers in the world you want as long as there are reports available online for me to do my own research to bring you closest to all the unsolved mysteries in this world, because I can find all the paths to the Truth, and what the Future holds. All I need is to observe, test and probe to research on anything I want, what you need to do will take months to achieve, all I need is a few hours.​

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