An Italian Fuel Cell Maker That Feeds Itself Pushes into Emerging Markets

 
As demand for mobile phones in developing countries explodes, telecom operators are investing hundreds of millions of dollars in infrastructure at a rapid pace. The number of base stations, which anchor towers and house equipment, will reach nearly 2.2 million in 2012, about double since 2007, according to GSMA, a mobile operators trade group in London. Each station requires a backup power source to keep network service going in case of a power outage.
Telecoms have long used lead-acid batteries and diesel generators for backup power. Now a dozen or so fuel cell makers are trying to persuade them to use their alternative systems. They say fuel cells, based on a century-old technology, are more reliable, perform longer, and are cleaner than traditional backup sources.
To distinguish itself from the pack, Electro Power Systems, a 7-year-old manufacturer in the northern Italian city of Turin, is wooing would-be clients with what it says are the first fuel cell systems that don’t require an external fuel supply. Its systems bundle together fuel cells and an electrolyzer, another veteran technology, to generate their own fuel, hydrogen. The company’s most recent innovation: hooking the system to wind turbines and solar panels to harness their energy to make the hydrogen.
Developing an all-in-one system that uses energy from renewables to produce and store hydrogen “is the holy grail for a lot of [fuel cell] companies,” says Kerry-Ann Adamson, a director at cleantech research and consulting firm Pike Research, which is headquarted in Boulder, Colorado. ElectroPS is the only company with “a commercially available unit in that package,” she says. “They are leading the way in that area.”
Housed in a cube-shaped cabinet that measures about 1 cubic meter, the ElectroPS system works like this: When there’s a blackout, the fuels cells kick in, generating electricity and water from hydrogen and oxygen. The water is stored in tanks until the grid comes back on or, in the newest iteration, when a renewable source is available. Then the electrolzyer passes an electrical current through the water to produce more hydrogen and oxygen, which is kept in vessels until needed by the fuel cells during the next blackout. The self-contained system requires little maintenance beyond an annual top-up of water.
Adamson forecasts the market for fuel cell backup units for telecom installations to balloon to $3.6 billion by 2017, from $38 million in 2010. ElectroPS had sales of $4.5 million in 2010 and $6 million in 2011, says founder and Chief Executive Adriano Marconetto, 51. He launched the company with three scientists at the Politecnico di Torino in 2005 after learning about the technology through his previous startup, an Italian designer of clean energy systems that imported fuel cells from the U.S. The 50-employee company will become profitable in 2015, he says.
One early adopter, Telecom Italia, Italy’s largest telecom, bought its first fuel cell system from ElectroPS in 2009. It now owns 250 of the systems and will buy approximately 50 more in 2012, says Alberto Landucci, who is in charge of energy saving initiatives at Telecom Italia in Rome. He says the ElectroPS fuel cell unit is “simple, reliable,” and an improvement on traditional battery backup because it lasts longer, costs less to operate, and can work in locations with high temperatures. Diesel generators, which may be 40 percent cheaper to buy than fuel cells, ultimately cost more in fuel, soundproofing, maintenance, and pollution checks, he says.
The most expensive ElectroPS system, with power output of 12 kilowatts, or enough to back up a large base station shared by different operators, costs up to €25,000. Customers typically recoup their investment in less than three years, Marconetto says.
“The cost is up front,” says Virg Bernero, mayor of Lansing, Michigan. The city spent $35,000 on an ElectroPS unit in 2011 for backup power to a public safety radio system; a battery would have cost less than half that. “As we replace our other equipment, we would consider buying more” fuel cells when the budget allows, says Bernero, noting the long-term savings.
More than 600 installations around the world use ElectroPS fuel cells, nearly half in emerging markets, says Marconetto. ElectroPS, which sold its first system in Germany in 2007, focused on telecom operators because “they understand the importance of backup,” says Marconetto. “Soon we realized the biggest opportunities were in emerging areas, especially in Asia.” He expects the “vast majority” of future sales to come from those regions. India is adding 3 million mobile subscribers a month, according to the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India.
“There’s such a colossal growth in mobile subscribers” in developing countries, says David Hart, a director at sustainable energy consulting company E4tech in Lausanne, Switzerland. Where the grid isn’t reliable and backup power is needed more frequently and for longer periods, “there’s more room for companies like EPS,” he says.
To contact the reporter on this story: Siobhan Crise at siobhancrise@gmail.com
To contact the editor responsible for this story: Nick Leiber at nleiber@bloomberg.net
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What will the impact of this technology if it is customised to be used in hybrid cars that uses both fuel cells and petrol? What about backup power for buildings? Easily these two sectors can contribute job creations that cover half the unemployed workforce of Singapore.
Our EDB is not working overtime to comb the entire world for innovations and analyse it’s potential to bring it back to Singapore to invest so as to grow the economy. With a good track record and ready funds, I am sure it is not impossible to find worthy partners.
The trick is to study the processes and ask the right questions, to analyse the potential, a feasibility study to calculate the extend of innovation and it’s lifespan.
And Yes, in order to learn about something, I will break it down to study its codes like software, finding its functions and re-assemble it anyway I want to find the solutions, even if it is a black box. 
The right information is what I require even though it is thru a third party, I can tap his experience and make judgement calls just by analysing his reports, now with the Internet, it is even easier doing so.
I derived my knowledge from reading news around the world, history and many articles written by professionals in their fields, in order to develop the understanding to solve problems.
And I have chosen God’s eternal life instead of a world of riches to make everyone my slave. 
My mission is to eradicate poverty and hunger within a lifetime, and I will use my skills and talents to achieve HIS aim.
I am not my Master, HE who comes after me will come in his glory, power and everyone will know WHO HE IS.
– Contributed by Oogle.

什么如果是定制的使用燃料电池和汽油的混合动力汽车使用这种技术的影响?有关建筑物的备用电源怎么样?容易,这两个行业可以促进就业的创作,包括新加坡的失业劳动力的一半。
我们教育局不加班梳整个世界的创新和分析它,使其恢复到新加坡投资,使经济增长的潜力。具有良好的跟踪记录,并准备资金,我相信它是不可能找到有价值的合作伙伴。
关键是要研究的进程,并提出正确的问题,分析的潜力,进行可行性研究,计算创新和延长它的寿命。
没错,为了进一步了解的东西,我会打破它,研究它的代码,如软件,发现其职能和重新组装它,反正我要找到解决方案,即使它是一个黑盒子
正确的信息什么,我需要的,即使它是通过第三方,我可以利用自己的经验和判断,只是他的报告中分析,现在的互联网呼叫,它是这样做更容易。
来自周围世界历史和许多在各自领域的专业人士撰写文章的新闻阅读我的知识,以发展解决问题的理解
而我选择了永恒的生命,而不是一个世界的财富,使每个人都我的奴隶
我的任务是消除贫困和饥饿,在一生中,我将用我的技能和才华实现的目的
我不是我的主人​​来后,会在他的荣耀,权力每个人都知道他是谁
– 提供者Oogle

Author: Gilbert Tan TS

IT expert with more than 20 years experience in Multiple OS, Security, Data & Internet , Interests include AI and Big Data, Internet and multimedia. An experienced Real Estate agent, Insurance agent, and a Futures trader. I am capable of finding any answers in the world you want as long as there are reports available online for me to do my own research to bring you closest to all the unsolved mysteries in this world, because I can find all the paths to the Truth, and what the Future holds. All I need is to observe, test and probe to research on anything I want, what you need to do will take months to achieve, all I need is a few hours.​

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