The problem with an imperfect Market

Concept Theory 1
“Money will flow into the most free market offering the maximum returns.”


Concept Theory 2
“How to maximise Capitalism? Where Demand=Supply will give you the maximum returns.”

Concept Theory 3
“The New Economy is a Perfect Market, where the old economy is an imperfect market. Markets will react immediately with the free flow of information to correct any flaws in demand and supply.”


Concept Theory 4
“Globalisation is the co-operation of every markets, every governments.”

Concept Theory 5
“By solving Capitalism, and the use of money, resources will be maximised for maximum gain.” 

Concept Theory 6
“With the Internet, information flows freely and the markets reacts immediately.”


Concept Theory 7
“Investments is engaging the markets all the time, hedging against your risks, for returns.”


Concept Theory 8
“In either a Bull or Bear market, money is still made, all of the time.”

Concept Theory 9
“Small money can be used to hedge against a future event requiring a Large Sum with the use of complex derivatives, underwriting the risks/returns ratio and the pooling of resources.”
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“As such, the flow of hot money is very disruptive to the fragal economy and causes all kinds of problems like hyper-inflation and imbalances, and rises of prices in commodities and assets. But liquidity of money in capitalism is essential for growth in the economy, how do we strike a balance? By keeping interest rates low for a prolong period will not encourage savings but spending, but how long of your future earnings can you afford to borrow against?
Liberal controlled re-expansion of credit (Refinancing and recapitalisation) is a better answer for liquidity in the markets than pure liquidity in the hands of a few with the credit ratings. Everything from houses, cars, businesses, commodities, assets can qualify for refinancing and reassessment of value/risks for the portion that has already been paid up(100%) with the borrower’s credit ratings in consideration. Unsecured loans can be extended to up to 6 times his monthly salary instead of the present 3 times. It will indirectly spur consumption and more investments into the future by the expansion of credit for economic growth, ensuring the soundness of financial institutions with confidence in the future. It will also redistribute wealth evenly for the haves and haves not. Since the risks of a global asset bubble has been corrected and taken away, it is back to the basics of fundamental growth.”

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2011/update/02/index.htm
Contributed by Oogle. 

观的理论1
“钱会流入最自由的市场,提供了最大的回报。”
观的理论2
“如何最大限度地发挥资本主义?需求=供给会给你最大的回报。”
观的理论3
“新经济是一个完美的市场,旧经济是不完善的市场,市场的反应会立即与资讯自由流通,以正确的需求和供给的任何缺陷。”
观的理论4
“全球化是每一个市场,每一个政府的合作。”
观的理论5
“解决资本主义,用钱,资源将得到最大限度的发挥最大增益。”
观的理论6
“随着互联网,信息自由流动和市场反应立即。”
观的理论7
“投资是搞市场的时候,对冲风险的回报。”
观的理论8
“在任何一个牛市或熊市,钱仍然是所有时间。”
观的理论9
“小的钱可用于复杂的衍生工具的使用需要一个大数目,承保的风险/收益率和集中资源,以防止将来发生的事件对冲。”

“因此,热钱的流动是非常破坏性的fragal经济,并导致恶性通货膨胀和不平衡,商品和资产价格上升等问题的种种,但在资本主义的货币流动性的增长是必不可少的的经济,我们如何罢工为延长期间,通过保持低利率的平衡呢?将不鼓励储蓄,但支出,但借款的,你可以买得起你的未来收益如何?
自由控制信用再膨胀(再融资和资本结构调整)是一个更好的流动性比一些与信用评级的手中流动性纯市场的答案。一切从房子,汽车,商业,商品,资产可以有资格进行再融资和重估价值/风险已经支付了在考虑借款人的信用评级(100%)的部分。无抵押贷款,可以扩展到高达6倍月薪,而不是现在的的3倍。到未来,这将间接刺激消费和增加投资,信贷扩张对经济增长,确保金融机构的稳健性与对未来的信心。它也将重新分配财富的富人和富人不均匀。由于一个全球性的资产泡沫的风险已得到纠正,并拿走了,这是基本增长的基础。“
http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2011/update/02/index.htm
撰稿人由Oogle。
—————————————————————————————–

Refinancing Mortgages Won’t Fix Housing Market: Edward Glaeser

The New York Times reported last week that the Obama administration was considering a proposal to “allow millions of homeowners with government-backed mortgages to refinance them at today’s lower interest rates, about 4 percent.”
The measure’s supporters tout this as an almost cost-free way to stimulate the economy, boost the housing market and reduce foreclosures. But universal refinancing is far from free, and is poorly designed to stimulate either the economy or the housing market. Certainly, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the huge finance companies now under government control, will have to allow some mortgage modifications in order to reduce their foreclosure losses. That calls for smart, selective policies, not universal refinancing.
This wouldn’t be the first time that the government has gotten involved in the loan-modification and refinancing business. The Home Affordable Modification Program and the Home Affordable Refinance Program provided incentives to loan servicers willing to refinance or modify the loans of struggling homeowners. These were modest, sensible programs, but they have helped fewer homeowners than some might wish.
The most extreme proposal now being floated involves refinancing at current low rates all the mortgages insured by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. One of the big appeals is that it seems like free stimulus. As the Times reported, “proponents say the plan carries little risk because the mortgages are already guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.”

Cost Billions

But even supporters of the plan, including my fellow Bloomberg View columnist Ezra Klein, emphasize that refinancing would mean that “Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac eat billions by giving up their ability to challenge these reps and warrants” given by mortgage issuers in the first place.
While forgoing the right to make banks bear the burden of carelessly vetted mortgages is a real cost, the largest price tag of any refinancing program is the direct one: Mortgages now paying investors 6 percent would pay only 4 percent. Someone would lose those interest payments, which Klein suggests may amount to as much as $85 billion annually.
My quick calculation based on the Times’s interest-rate graphic came to about $35 billion per year over many years. If the program works, agency-insured mortgages would be paid off early and bondholders would take losses essentially equal to the benefits gained by borrowers.

MBS Investors

As nobody loves a mortgage-backed security investor, this may seem like free stimulus, but, like it or not, we are all MBS investors now. When we’re talking about reducing payments to Freddie and Fannie mortgage holders, we’re really talking about reducing payments to ourselves. Our government owns a massive amount of agency-insured debt and would take a significant part of the hit if debtors reduced their payments.
The Federal Reserve System owns almost $900 billion of securities insured by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Those two finance companies, which are now squarely part of our government, have retained mortgage portfolios of $730 billion and $680 billion, respectively. The Treasury still had about $80 billion of these securities on the books as of July. This $2.39 trillion portfolio is roughly equal in size to the Times’s estimate of “$2.4 trillion in mortgages backed by Fannie and Freddie” that “carried interest rates of 4.5 percent or higher.”
This rough equivalence doesn’t mean that private investors won’t bear much of the cost of prepayment, but some significant share of the revenue losses from lower mortgage payments would surely be paid by taxpayers.

Stimulus Effect

What about the program’s benefits? Refinancing makes little sense as stimulus, whose goal is to provide a temporary benefit that induces more spending today. Instead, state-supported refinancing is a benefit that pays off year after year for as long as three decades. As the loss to investors is experienced immediately, while the benefit to credit-constrained borrowers is spread over time, the net effect on the economy may well be negative.
It’s also hard to see why housing markets would be significantly strengthened by lowering the interest payments for existing homeowners. My work suggests that the link between interest rates and housing market is relatively modest, and this refinancing effort won’t do anything to reduce borrowing costs for new buyers.

Lower Payments

The most natural way in which widespread refinancing for troubled homeowners could support the housing market is by reducing foreclosures, and empirical work typically finds weak evidence that lower mortgage payments reduce the likelihood of defaults.
My colleague Christopher Foote, along with Kristopher Gerardi, Lorenz Goette and Paul Willen, estimate that a 20 percent reduction in the initial interest-rate cost of a mortgage would lead the monthly default rate to fall by about 0.4 percentage point for subprime borrowers and less than 0.1 percentage point for standard borrowers. They find that changes in the unemployment rate or housing prices have a significantly bigger impact on defaults than changes in the interest rate.
After all, if refinancing saved so much money by reducing defaults, private lenders would surely find mortgage modification far more appealing than they do.
Government support that enables refinancing among borrowers who couldn’t refinance in the private market on their own is a public transfer to these borrowers.

Rewarding Borrowers

Many people may wonder why the federal government should reward people who borrowed heavily to buy during the boom and whether such generosity doesn’t encourage future risk-taking. Others will surely ask why this aid isn’t means-tested or focused just on the elderly or families with small children, who might suffer most from a move. Still others will question whether it is wise to try to keep people in houses they never should have bought and still can’t afford.
Yet Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are left with their obligation for large numbers of defaulting and potentially defaulting mortgages. Managing this portfolio makes some mortgage modifications appropriate, as long as these measures are motivated by a sensible desire to reduce taxpayer outlays, rather than high-flying claims about the widespread economy-wide benefits from subsidized refinancing.
Fannie and Freddie also have the problem of managing their stock of already foreclosed homes, and the Times discussed a second proposal to rent some of those homes so that they can be sold slowly.

Rental Proposal

Exploring options makes sense, because selling homes too quickly means low prices, especially if you are trying to move thousands of foreclosed homes at once. Yet the government needs to be quite careful here as well, because renting homes that were meant to be owned is never easy.
The case for slow sales was made in a classic paper by David Genesove and Chris Mayer, which found that Boston condominium sellers with high loan-to-equity levels sold their units more slowly and got substantially higher prices. Steve Levitt and Chad Syverson found that real estate agents, who presumably know more about housing markets than ordinary sellers, typically take 9.5 days longer to sell their homes and receive 3.7 percent higher prices, holding everything else constant.
By contrast, my colleague John Campbell, along with his co- authors Stefano Giglio and Parag Pathak, estimate a general forced-sale discount of 18 percent and a foreclosure discount of 28 percent.

Lost Value

Selling slowly offers some chance of reducing taxpayer losses on these foreclosed sales and keeping housing prices stable, but renting these homes would be tricky. We should also expect significant losses in value from renting, because renters have less incentive than homeowners to take care of the property. A significant literature shows that homes lose value – – as much as 1 percent per year — when they are rented. The maintenance problem is likely to be exacerbated if, as I expect, the Feds end up trusting someone else to handle the rental contract.
The Federal Housing Finance Agency, the regulator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, is soliciting ideas from the public and investors. I hope that the government doesn’t end up subsidizing private investors to turn landlord and that any landlords would post a significant maintenance deposit to cover damage to the property.

A massive refinancing effort is likely to have little impact on the economy or foreclosures or housing prices. What it would do, however, is hurt our government’s already precarious balance sheet by reducing the payments on its vast mortgage portfolio.
Fannie and Freddie should focus on reducing public losses with sensible, limited mortgage modifications and by selling foreclosed homes reasonably slowly.

(Edward Glaeser, an economics professor at Harvard University, is a Bloomberg View columnist. He is the author of “Triumph of the City.” The opinions expressed are his own.)
To contact the writer of this article: Edward Glaeser at eglaeser@harvard.edu.
To contact the editor responsible for this article: Max Berley at mberley@bloomberg.net.
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“An asset like property will appreciate over a long tenure and is a better hedge against inflation and the holding of pure cash.
To solve the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac problem, the US government should not end up servicing the debt but by outsourcing it to the private sector by providing incentives to homeowners to refinance with private borrowers. A longer tenure, lower interests repayment are considerations as in the longer run, asset appreciation will cover losses made during the crises. The calculation of break even period with the longer tenure, using other longer term or higher risk financial instruments like derivatives or credit swaps to cover as security, or to underwrite the risks of default and incorporate it into the contract. The borrower can stretch up to a 60 year tenure with an addition of another guarantor. I am sure there are other financial experts out there who can easily derived a solution based on the viability of these factors. It is a better solution than immediate foreclosure, which will write off billions from the balance sheets. 
The use of complex derivatives and underwriting can also be used to solve a country’s Healthcare needs by outsourcing to the private market, it is a new ballgame, and not many insurers are financially prudent to use it to pool resources and make profits.
The use of financial modelling of data, creating different views with data, and the analysis of different models, where solutions can be found within a range of answers, and ultimately the solution. I am sure a mathematician or underwriter can provide you the same answers as I am not trained. The use of advanced modelling techniques could give you a view like no other, like analysing all the factors that will affect a certain indices, the input of news, market share, with the complementary views of other movement of a range of other indices, and other corresponding markets, and other financial reportings, with advance movements that can scale and contract, which will tabulate your risks involved.”

Contributed by Oogle.

Author: Gilbert Tan TS

IT expert with more than 20 years experience in Multiple OS, Security, Data & Internet , Interests include AI and Big Data, Internet and multimedia. An experienced Real Estate agent, Insurance agent, and a Futures trader. I am capable of finding any answers in the world you want as long as there are reports available online for me to do my own research to bring you closest to all the unsolved mysteries in this world, because I can find all the paths to the Truth, and what the Future holds. All I need is to observe, test and probe to research on anything I want, what you need to do will take months to achieve, all I need is a few hours.​

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